Wake Up, Log On, Repeat

Art+by+Hannah+Ellis

Art by Hannah Ellis

Wake up. Log on to class. Sleep. Repeat. 

Every day is the exact same. We had a few blissful weeks of being in the building every other day, yet now we are trapped behind a computer screen once again 

We go to bed hoping for a new and different day to be there when the morning comes, but when the sun rises, it feels like it dawns on the same day that it had before. 


Voices in the hall: students’ remote schedules

“Wake up, Google Meet, sleep, Google Meet, sleep, Google Meet, sleep. Then contemplate the permanent sleep out of boredom.”

“Wake up, go to school, eat, sleep, repeat.”

“Frantically log on to Google Meet in the morning, struggle to go through four ninety minute classes in a row, nap, then stress. Then I repeat it all the next day.”


Many students are struggling with the constant feeling of being permanently doomed. 

It feels as though going through remote learning last year was easier. We still had hope that there was a light at the end of the Covid-19 tunnel, and eventually our lives would go back to normal

Now almost a year later, it is no wonder we all have run out of hope.

 We have been grateful for a whole year and it is draining. It is hard to believe that things will get better when they haven’t. Students have no trust that things will get better because it hasn’t, and we are being told to just keep going as if this isn’t damaging to our whole being.

We are expected to be grateful that we have this opportunity to go to school every day. It almost seems like students have so much pressure on their shoulders to be grateful for their opportunity to still learn in a pandemic. However, what people fail to consider is that remote learning is 

Teenagers today are being forced to look at the bright side, but many adults’ biggest complaint they had when they went to school was homework, not that a pandemic had been running rampant and ruining every aspect of life.

But now, a student complains once and is flooding with comments of “this could be worse”. It definitely could be worse, but that does not mean that right now isn’t bad. Why are we comparing traumas when this all just plainly stinks?  

It is okay for us to admit when things are not okay. Living in 2020 has not been easy. We do not have to downplay our emotions because someone else may be feeling worse than us. 

During this time, it is hard to be a student. Reach out to other students if you are struggling, as we are all going through this together. Everyone’s feelings toward remote learning are valid, and you are not alone in your emotions. Take care and be kind to yourself.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email