History and physics classes launch new collaborative catapult project

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Senior psychics students work together with sophomore US history students to create full-functioning catapults using plastic spoons, popsicle sticks, and rubber bands. This is the first year that Mr. Cariello and Mr. Courtemanche are doing this project. Photos by Emily Schackart

Mr. Cariello’s E period senior Physics and Mr. Courtemanche’s E period sophomore US History have collaborated for a joint World War I artillery lesson.

 

Students are designing artillery pieces to be used in a mock battle next week. The concepts needed for the project are taught in the two classes separately with physics teaching the students about projectile motion, and US history teaching the lesson of how artillery in WWI was used incorrectly.

The idea behind combining classes for a lesson is to take a different approach to students learning about science and history and to see how they can affect one another.

Combining history and science lessons allows students to grasp new perspectives on what they're learning in class.

Combining history and science lessons allows students to grasp new perspectives on what they’re learning in class.

“The big part of [this project] is to take what you learn in humanities and integrate it with engineering to understand and learn the topic,” Mr. Cariello said.

Students were given a packet of catapult designs, and worked together to recreate these designs using specific materials, such as popsicle sticks and rubber bands.

Students were given a packet of catapult designs, and worked together to recreate these designs using specific materials, such as popsicle sticks and rubber bands.

Teams for the project have been chosen and the groups within teams are integrated best as possible, mixing both seniors and sophomores in groups in order to get a fair amounts of knowledge on both the physics and history pieces of the project.

“When I was a kid, we had engineering projects in every class. You don’t see that anymore, so this project caters to those hands-on learners,” Mr. Cariello said.

The battle between the two teams will take place next Friday, December 11.

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