Quitting a job isn’t easy, so make sure you do it right

Knowing+the+right+time+to+leave+a+job+can+be+hard%2C+but+actually+quitting+is+harder.+Here+are+a+few+steps+you+can+follow+to+make+sure+your+resignation+is+professional.

Art by Natalie Karlson

Knowing the right time to leave a job can be hard, but actually quitting is harder. Here are a few steps you can follow to make sure your resignation is professional.

Quitting is a difficult thing to do. Whether you are scared of what your management will think or are fed up with the company, you want to make sure your resignation is professional and a calm transition.

The biggest and most effective step you can take to keep a good relationship with your current employer is to put in your two weeks notice when you feel like it is the appropriate time to quit.

This is a common courtesy and most employers will expect a notice from you. But a notice isn’t just a quick message saying “Hey I quit, my last day is tomorrow!” There’s a lot more that goes into it and a lot more information needed.

 

Addressing your resignation

To start off your letter, address it to your top managers, the ones in charge of employment and scheduling; they are the ones that will have to know first.

Then get straight to the point and say that this letter is your two weeks notice; they don’t want to read a bunch of fluff just to see that you quit. 

Ex.

“This letter is to inform you of my resignation from the company. My last day of employment will be [  ], two weeks from today.”

 

Explain why you are resigning

Your employers hired you and most likely have formed some type of relationship, so they deserve to know why you are leaving. From getting a new job to your availability not working with your work schedule anymore, be honest with them. Although they will probably be upset, it’s best to not sugar coat why you are leaving since it can show uncertainty if you do. Be brief, honest, and informative.

 

Thank your company

Even though you are leaving and might have hated the company, they still chose to hire you and you should be grateful for that. Thank your employers for the time you got to spend working for them and thank them for teaching you any important skills you can use in a future job.

 

Sign your name

Even if your resignation is written on a torn up napkin, it’s still a formal document so you must sign your name. Just writing your initials or first name seems very unprofessional, so even though you don’t need your legal signature, write your full name to close out your two weeks.

 

But overall, no matter if you followed these steps or not, just be courteous. This is your employer’s job too, so just like you don’t want to be yelled at by a customer or have a long rush, they don’t want people quitting since it only adds more stress. So be respectful, do the right thing, and give a two weeks notice.

 

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